Repeal of mining double subsidy would fund clean up of America’s rivers, streams

August 6, 2009

Washington, D.C., August 6th -- S 1570, The Elimination of Double Subsidies for Hardrock Mining Industry Act, is legislation, like 1872 mining law reform, that is long overdue. We applaud Senators Feingold, Cantwell, Feinstein and Sanders for introducing it earlier this week.

Passage would generate $50 million per year, half of which would fund abandoned mine reclamation. This money is sorely needed. The EPA estimates that 40% of the headwaters of western watersheds are polluted by mining, and they also estimate that abandoned mine reclamation will cost $50 billion.

Testimony of Cathy Carlson Before The Senate Energy and Natural resources Committee on S.796 and S.140

July 14, 2009 • Cathy Carlson

Testimony of Cathy Carlson, EARTHWORKS policy Advisor, before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee regarding the need for mining law reform.

Statement of Payal Sampat, EARTHWORKS, on Supreme Court ruling on mining waste disposal in water bodies

June 26, 2009

Washington, D.C., 6/26 - 6/26/2009 US and global waterways are at greater risk of industrial contamination following the US Supreme Court s ruling this week allowing a mining company to dump millions of gallons of toxic waste into an Alaskan lake. The Court's decision was based on a 2002 Bush-era policy that allows solid waste and contaminated materials to be dumped directly into lakes, streams and other water bodies. As Justice Ginsburg wrote in her dissent, the ruling contravenes the "core command" of the Clean Water Act. EARTHWORKS is deeply disappointed by the ruling and its negative implications for clean water.

Senators, Representatives act to close Halliburton Loophole in the Safe Drinking Water Act

June 9, 2009

(Washington, D.C., June 9) - Today Senators Casey (D-PA) and Schumer (D-NY), and Representatives DeGette (D-CO), Polis (D-CO) and Hinchey (D-NY) introduced bills in the Senate and House to close the so-called "Halliburton Loophole" in the Safe Drinking Water Act that exempts hydraulic fracturing, and to require the public disclosure of hydraulic fracturing chemicals. The Halliburton loophole authorizes oil and gas drillers, exclusively, to inject known hazardous materials -- unchecked -- directly into or adjacent to underground drinking water supplies. It passed as part of the Bush Administration's Energy Policy Act of 2005.

"Energy development needn't threaten our drinking water and public health -- but under the Halliburton loophole, it does," said John Fenton, a rancher negatively impacted by drilling activity, and member of the Pavillion Area Concerned Citizens in Wyoming.

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Hydraulic Fracturing Myths and Facts

April 23, 2009 • Jennifer Goldman

New Bingaman Mining Legislation Would Bring Tens of Thousands of Jobs to Rural Communities

April 2, 2009

Washington, D.C., 04/02 -- Today, for the first time in over a decade, the Senate is moving forward with reform of one of the most archaic policies governing our public lands. Senator Jeff Bingaman, Chairman of the Energy and Natural Resources Committee, has introduced S. 796, the Hardrock Mining and Reclamation Act of 2009, to regulate the mining of hardrock minerals -- like gold, copper and uranium -- on public lands. This bill will create jobs and provide economic opportunities for rural communities while cleaning up a massive legacy of toxic mining pollution.

‘Fracking’ regulation may undo energy bill

March 17, 2009 • Hil Anderson

EARTHWORKS Fact Sheet: Hardrock Mining and Reclamation Act of 2009

March 2, 2009 • Lauren Pagel

EARTHWORKS’ fact sheet for HR 699, Rep. Rahall’s 1872 mining law reform.